How to Write Like a Professional

How to Write Like a Professional
6 Surprising Mistakes That Make Writers Look Like Amateurs... and How to Avoid Them

Tuesday, July 31, 2018

You Know You're a Writer When... [6 of 10]


You Know You're a Runner When... [6 of 10]


You know you're a runner when you plan your vacations around an upcoming race.

You know you're a writer when you plan your vacations around a writing conference or retreat.

You know you're a writer who runs when you do both!

You know you're a runner when... || Christie Wright Wild || If you plan your vacations around upcoming races, whether it be a 5k, a 10k, a half marathon, or a full marathon, you're a runner.

You know you're a writer when... If you plan your vacations around the desire to spend a week or a weekend with a bunch of other writers at a retreat or a conference, then you're definitely a writer. || Christie Wright Wild


The Story Behind Writers Who Run


In 2014, this was me. I was listening to an interview on a podcast about portable businesses and how much she loved traveling the world in her wanderlust nature. It was then that I realized the only time I ever traveled was to go to a race or to attend a writing event.

That's when the idea for a retreat for writers and runners was born. The Writers Who Run Retreat.

Racing for Runners is Like a Social Event for Introverts


Some people run for the sheer joy of it. Some people run even though they hate it. Some people prefer the companionship of others when they run. No matter your poison, it's your choice to partake. You can't not run. It's in your blood, part of your DNA, for whatever reason. Love it or hate it, you're a runner.

I for one, love it. I would love to incorporate more "running for the sheer joy of it" into my life. But there are only so many hours in the day, two of which are spent driving. If there was a way I could run and drive at the same time, I would do it. Anyone want to become a millionaire? Bottle that idea up!

I tend to run just to train for races. I love racing. I'm slow and I rarely place (it's happened twice - they were very small races), but I love the adrenaline rush a race offers me. If you love to run and you've never entered a race, do it once. The bigger the better - unless you have a fear of crowds.

Writers Need Other Writers


Writers are just as odd as runners. What's even more unique is when you find the two inside the same human being. A writer who runs. There's a Facebook group for that.

When writers go to writing events such as workshops, conferences, and retreats, they are being brave. What if they have never shown their work to anyone else before? What if they have never admitted to anyone that they even like to write?

Writers going to a conference for FUN are also bold. They are saying that they are serious about their writing. That they have something to say to the world and they want help to make their writing the best that it can possibly be.

We need other writers. To read their words. To hear their advice. To talk to and brainstorm with. To network and encourage and inspire one another.
If you're proud to be a writer, give me a "HOO-RA!"
Leave a comment and shout it out to the world! HOO-RA!


Related Posts:
You Know You're a Writer [1 of 10] | You Know You're a Runner [1 of 10]
You Know You're a Writer [2 of 10] | You Know You're a Runner [2 of 10]
You Know You're a Writer [3 of 10] | You Know You're a Runner [3 of 10]
You Know You're a Writer [4 of 10] | You Know You're a Runner [4 of 10]
You Know You're a Writer [5 of 10] | You Know You're a Runner [5 of 10]

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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Comes a Wind by Linda Arms White


Plot Arc Library: Picture Book Outline #1


This is the first official installment of a picture book outline for my new Plot Arc Library. Comes a Wind is a children's picture book written by Linda Arms White and illustrated by Tom Curry.

Summary/Hook/Pitch/About/Description:

While visiting their mother's ranch, two brothers who constantly try to best each other swap tall tales about big winds are surprised by the fiercest wind they have ever seen.

Picture Book Outline for Comes a Wind by Linda Arms White || Plot Arc Library, christiewrightwild.com

Plot Point 1: The Signup (aka the catalyst)


Mama wrote her two sons a letter inviting them over to celebrate her birthday -- with one birthday wish: for them to get along and "stop squabblin'"

Plot Point 2: The Gunshot (aka the point of no return)


After the wind picks up when Mama heads in the house to fetch some lemonade, Clement says, "Looks like it comes a wind."

Clyde starts the squabblin' by saying... "You call that a wind? Why, one day it was so windy..."

And the trouble ensues.

Plot Point 3: The Halfway Point (aka the midpoint)


Mama returns with the lemonade and goes back in for the cake. More tall tales are told. And then... the sky turns a dusty red as the wind picks up and cows start flying.



Outline Your Novel:
Learn How to Study Books and Movies So You Can
Map Out a Basic Plot For Your Own Novel






Plot Point 4: The Wall (aka rock bottom)


Mama returns with the cake and is blown over the barn. The wind stops and she lands on top of the weather vane.

Plot Point 5: The Finish Line (aka the climax)


Clement and Clyde work together to rescue Mama and they finally agree:

"Now that--" said Clement.
"--was a wind!" said Clyde.

Did you like this Picture Book Outline in the Plot Arc Library? Do you have a special request of a popular movie or picture book you'd like me to use as a future example? Share in the comments!

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Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Jurassic Park


The Marathon Method of Plotting


This is the first official installment in my brand new Plot Arc Library. Movies are faster to absorb than reading an entire novel. So when studying story structure and plot points, it's a great idea to look at popular movie examples to understand plot arc.

The nature of a plot point is such that it is short, like a simple mile marker in a race. Just a spec on the larger spectrum of the full story (or race). The more examples you see (and study), the easier plotting will become. When you think about plotting your novel like running a marathon, it starts to make a little more sense.

Movie outline for Jurassic Park || Christie Wright Wild - Plot Arc Library

Plot Point 1: The Signup


The first plot point of the five major plot points in any story is also known as the inciting incident, the call to action, the defining moment, or the catalyst. The Marathon Method of Plotting calls the first plot point in the narrative story arc THE SIGNUP.

John Hammond, the old rich man who owns Jurassic Park, invites archaeologist, Alan Grant, to join him for the weekend to check out his new park in hopes that he will agree to endorse it. John keeps it a mystery from Alan, but says it's right up his alley.

Plot Point 2: The Gunshot


The Gunshot is the point of no return.

In Jurassic Park, this is the moment when we see that Alan has agreed to visit the park. He is on the helicopter with his colleague, Ellie, a chaotician, Ian Malcolm, the "bloodsucking lawyer", and of course John Hammond, himself. Alan is on the journey now. There's no turning back.

Plot Point 3: The Halfway Point


When Alan saves one of John's two grandchildren, Timmy from the car dangling in a tree, he has overcome a major challenge, but we know that there will be many more challenges to overcome: the storm, getting back to the safety of the compound, and more.



Outline Your Novel:
Learn How to Study Books and Movies So You Can
Map Out a Basic Plot For Your Own Novel






Plot Point 4: The Wall


The Wall is the lowest point, the darkest abyss, rock bottom.

In Jurassic Park, The Wall is when the velociraptors attack. They attack Ellie after she gets the power turned back on. They attack John's two grandchildren when they are in the kitchen back at the compound. They continue to attack until the T-rex shows up, allowing everyone to escape.

Plot Point 5: The Finish Line


The Finish Line is the climax of the story, the point in which the goal has been reached (or failure has been established).

In this story, the Finish Line is when everyone escapes from the raptors and T-rex and Alan shouts to John as they climb in the Jeep, "Hammond, after careful consideration, I've decided not to endorse your park."

Did you like this Plot Point Example? Do you have a special request of a popular movie you'd like me to use as a future Plot Point Example? Share in the comments!

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Jurassic Park - Plot Arc Example - When John Hammond invites Alan Grant to his theme park, he hopes to get several endorsements. || Story structure of the movie Jurassic Park.

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